Hi Everyone!

As we all know, it is much easier to say things than to do things. However, many of us would still rather use our words than use our actions. 

In English, we have some idioms that describe such a situation where people say things that they cannot prove because they do not take action. 

Here are a few of them:

Talk is cheap
-this means "talking is easy to do so people will talk a lot to make themselves feel or look good"
-this is often said when someone makes a commitment but the other person does not really believe them until they take action
-or it is said when someone expresses their opinion but does not prove it

A: I'm the best at this video game!
B: Yeah? Well, talk is cheap, so let's play!

A: I am going to buy you a new car!
B: Hey, talk is cheap. I will believe that when I see a new red car in the driveway.




Action speak louder than words
-this is less of an idiom and more of a collocation, however, actions cannot "speak", but in English, we often use "speak" to mean "communicate"
-here, louder means "more believable" or "more convincing" - "convincing" means it can change your mind / opinion

A: I love you!
B: Well, actions speak louder than words. You should show me that you love me. 



Put your money where your mouth is
-this is most often said when someone claims to be better at something than someone else or when someone wants to challenge someone who made a claim in a competion
-this implies that people want to wager or bet money and compete in a challenge - the winner of the challenge will take the money, yet, when this idiom is used, it rarely involves money

A: I am the best at this video game!
B: Yeah? Haha, ok, put your money where your mouth is...let's play!

Picture
"Put your money where your mouth is!"


"You say you care about the environment, but you still drive a car! Put your money where your mouth is...walk to work instead."
(jokes)

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Happy English!

Sincerely, 
Gerry ( ;)
 


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